Ego-tripping

In one of psychologist David Elkind famous researches, adolescence experience this phenomenon known as the “imaginary audience“, whereby they think that every move of theirs is being watched with rapt attention (Holiday). Unfortunately, some adolescence never grow out of this fantasy when they enter into adulthood. Perpetuated by social media and this false pretence of individual importance, some people develop this vainglorious pomposity—posting incessant selfies upon selfies, details of their meals and outfit, and some even the type of creamer they use in their coffee.

Did Icarus not demonstrate what happens to the hubris of human?

More importantly, when did we allow ourselves to become consumers of such content?
Why did we allow ourselves to become perpetuators, cheerleaders, to such vanity and self-absorbance?

Vivre sans temps mort. (Live without wasted time.)

Wildly humbling and eye-opening. I love how nimble and sharp Holiday’s words and thoughts are.

4 Comments

  1. Sorry, I’m so late getting to read your post, Andie. I’ve been ridiculously busy getting ready for my son and grandchildren to move it. I haven’t even had time to write a post of my own this or last week. I love your post here. You are right about the ego being the downfall of man (or some men/women). Perhaps, the moral in the story of Icarus should be taught in our schools as a reason not to be so egotistical. I was only mentioning to another blogger about these people who plaster photos of their dinners or pets all over Facebook, Instagram etc. Why on Earth do they think we would be interested in that, and more to the point, why are they so vain in the first place? Great post, Andie. Thank you for sharing it. Ellie xx

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